Moms have a lot to accomplish during a typical day, and skincare sometimes gets pushed way down the priority list. We’d like to share several healthy skin hacks and strategies, as common-sense solutions to some common skin troubles, that don’t require the time or expense of a spa day.

 

1. Eat foods high in Vitamin C.

Vitamin C is vital in the production of collagen, a protein that acts as a building block for all our connective tissue. Collagen gives healthy skin its resilience, but as it tends to decrease with age, a significant intake of Vitamin C helps maintain youthful healthy levels.

“Vitamin C is important for keeping the skin younger looking. I recommend a daily Vitamin C intake of about 300 to 500mg to maintain healthy skin quality,” says Lorraine Meisner, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Medical School.

 

2. Sleep on your back.

Sleeping on your side or stomach creates wrinkles and creases on one side of your face. Sleeping on your back minimizes the downward pull of gravity while maintaining a more consistent position of skin, facial muscles, and bone structure.

Also, using a satin pillowcase will prevent the removal of moisturizer and anti-aging eye cream if you do turn during sleep.

 

3. Always choose a physical sunscreen.

Physical sunscreens utilize minerals zinc oxide or titanium dioxide as active ingredients. These sit on top of the healthy skin where they absorb UV rays, convert them into infrared heat energy, then dispose of the heat away from the skin. They work immediately and do not seep into the skin like petrochemical products.

 

PRO TIP > To avoid a whitish hue, try tinted zinc oxide sunscreen like this or this sun stick.

 

4. Zinc oxide is better than titanium dioxide.

Zinc oxide, extremely good at protecting against both UVA and UVB rays and significantly more efficient and safer than titanium dioxide, is the sole sunscreen active ingredient that’s FDA approved for use on infants.

Zinc oxide is non-toxic and safe for marine life. Stable in sunlight, it provides greater protection from deep tissue UVA rays than titanium oxide (a toxic heavy metal). Look for a non-nano Zinc Oxide.

 

5. Eat foods that get your body to do the work.

Moisturizers can ward off dry skin, but so does what you’re eating. Foods high in omega-3 fatty acids hydrate the skin and prevent inflammation. For an omega-3 supplement, opt for krill oil, since it’s got a much higher absorption rate than fish oil and doesn’t go rancid as quickly. For foods, go for chia seeds, flax seeds, organic avocados (for their good fat content) and wild salmon.

Burns, both the sunburn and hot surface kinds, cause body tissues to deteriorate, fat deposits to decrease and proteins to break down. Vitamin C and Vitamin E replenish those nutrients and remove free radicals, which is a crucial part of burn healing therapy. A body rich with Vitamins C and Vitamin E is well stocked to repair all sorts of skin damage, in effect, healing itself.

 

6. Vitamin C also protects against sunburn and cell damage.

Short term skin damage, like sunburn, is caused by exposure to UVB rays. Exposure to UVB rays produces free radicals, which are unstable molecules that steal electrons from healthy molecules. Your body’s natural free-radical defenses often aren’t enough to prevent damage by these ultraviolet rays effectively.

To increase the body’s natural sun defenses, doctors recommend daily Vitamin C intake of 1,000 or more mg to maintain effective levels of antioxidants needed to effectively neutralize sun-related free radicals.

 

7. Wear long sleeves.

When you remember how easy it is to stay protected when you cover up, you can pretty much stop worrying about all the other details. Just wear long sleeves – they’re always on, don’t wash off, and you only need to put it on once and you’ll be protected all day.

 

PRO TIP: Choose a long sleeve shirt made from a sustainable material like recycled water bottles, organic cotton or bamboo.

 

8. Eat more Omega 3s.

Healthy fats like Omega-3 fatty acids keep your skin looking young and radiant by increasing hydration and lowering inflammation. Chia seeds and flax seeds are both excellent sources of plant-based Omega-3 as well as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which benefits skin and hair by providing essential fats as well as b-vitamins for reduced dryness.

 

9. Avoid sunscreens with bug repellent.

Mixing sunscreens and pesticides causes increased skin adsorption of both pesticides and toxic chemicals within the sunscreen. The FDA is studying the safety of such combinations and is considering new labeling requirements. DEET may reduce sunscreen effectiveness.

If bug repellent is a must, avoid using it on the face, since fumes can be inhaled, and the chemicals can damage the eyes. Instead, read your sunscreen labels and look for safe ingredients.

 

10. Be happy.

Corny. And absolutely true. Self-esteem helps maintain healthy skin. When you feel good, you make healthier food choices, wash your face at night, and exercise more — all which contribute to skin strength. Plus with positive thought comes less stress, meaning you’re less likely to get breakouts or rashes. Get happy and your skin will, too.

 

In Closing

You don’t have to accept aging skin as a preordained fact of life. Eating and living well and using the right tools for sun protection will get your skin in shape and keep it that way, no matter what your age or lifestyle.